5 Common Vegan Myths

vegan recipes

Those who choose to adopt a vegan diet often encounter questions and criticism. It usually comes from well meaning family and friends, who are just concerned about your health and well being and who may have a few misconceptions regarding veganism.  Here Are 5 Common Vegan Myths :

Vegan Myth No.1 : Humans Need To Eat Meat To Be Healthy

This is not true at all… in fact eating meat increases the risk of three of mankind’s biggest killers, heart disease, cancer and strokes.

The American Dietetic Association (ADA) states that “Well planned vegan diets are healthful, nutritionally adequate and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases.”

According to ADA’s position. “Vegans tend to have a lower body mass index and lower overall cancer rates. Vegan diets tend to be lower in saturated fat and cholesterol and have higher levels of dietary fiber, magnesium and potassium, vitamins C and E, folate, carotenoids, flavonoids and other phytochemicals. These nutritional differences may explain some of the health advantages of those following a varied, balanced vegan diet.”

Vegan Myth No.2 : A Vegan Diet Doesn’t Provide Enough Protein

Vegans have no trouble at all getting enough protein…

Good sources of protein include :

Nuts such as almonds, cashews, pistachios and walnuts.

Seeds such as sesame, sunflower and pumpkin seeds.

Legumes which includes beans, lentils, peas, chickpeas and peanuts.

Whole grains such as brown rice, barley, quinoa and whole grain breads.

Soy Foods such as edamame, tofu, tempeh, soy milk and soy meats.

Vegan Myth No.3 : A Vegan Diet Doesn’t Provide Enough Iron

Studies have shown that iron deficiency anemia is no more common among vegans and vegetarians than it is amongst the general population.

One of the reasons for the satisfactory iron levels among vegans is the fact that their diets are naturally high in vitamin C. Vitamin C increases iron absorption. Many vegetables such as broccoli, spinach and bok choy are high in both iron and vitamin C.

Good sources of iron include :

Beans, peas, lentils, fortified cereals, dried fruits, dark leafy greens and whole grains.

Vegan Myth No.4 : It’s Expensive To Be Vegan

Going vegan doesn’t have to be expensive at all. For starters red meat, poultry and fish are all more expensive than plant protein. There are lots of cheap protein sources for vegans such as beans, lentils and tofu.

If you steer clear of too many processed foods such as faux meats and soy cheeses, you can in fact eat fairly inexpensively.

Here are some tips to help you go vegan on a budget :

Buy things such as nuts, grains, seeds and dried fruit in bulk.

Get your fresh fruit and vegetables from farmers markets.

Buy frozen veges too, which can often be cheaper than fresh.

If you can, start your own vege garden!

Stick as much as possible with whole foods and prepare your own meals from scratch.

Vegan Myth No.5 : It’s Too Hard To Follow A Vegan Diet

Going vegan has many great benefits but it can seem intimidating to begin with.

The best way to start is with simple whole foods and simple recipes.

Buy plenty of fruit, vegetables, legumes and whole grains. Also find a good fortified soy or rice milk. Plus nuts, seeds and dried fruit.

Some simple meal ideas are :

Vegetable stir fries served on brown rice.

Home made pizzas piled with vegetables and soy cheese.

Homemade vegetable soups served with wholegrain bread.

Pita pockets stuffed with salad ingredients or veges.

Salads packed with leafy greens, capsicum, red onion, carrots, beetroot… anything you fancy. And don’t forget to add legumes such as lentils or chickpeas for protein.

Bran flakes mixed with nuts, dried fruits and soy milk.

Smoothies are great too… you are only limited by your imagination.

Probably the hardest thing about going vegan is that animal products pop up in some unexpected places… such as marshmallows, alcohol and shampoo.

You can find a comprehensive list of hidden animal ingredients here :

=> Hidden Animal Ingredients

It’s a good idea to take the list with you when you go shopping.

You will be okay if you stick mainly with unprocessed whole foods and then just carefully read the labels of processed food, such as bread and cereals. In time you will get used to what products you can buy.

If you are considering going vegan and need a bit of help,  you will find a great article here :

=> 10 Tips To Help You Go Vegan

Debbie
IsVeganHealthy.com

Photo By : © Rosemary Buffoni | Dreamstime.com

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Going Vegan Top Ten Tips

Vegan Food
1. Don’t Let Family And Friends Discourage You

Going vegan is a personal decision and everyone should be able to live their life according to their own morals and beliefs, so don’t let naysayers discourage you. Be the happiest, healthiest vegan that you can possibly be, so nobody will be able to find any reason to criticize.

2. Stock Up On Plenty Of Quick Snack Items

If you are just starting out it is a good idea to stock up on lots of vegan friendly snacks, so you will always have something quick on hand when you are hungry. Things such as nuts, dried fruit, tortilla chips, rice crackers, peanut butter, almond butter, hummus and plenty of fresh fruit. Going vegan boosts your metabolism, so you may find that you are hungrier than usual. So it’s a good idea to have plenty of healthy snacks on hand, so you don’t feel deprived between meals.

3. Buy A Good Vegan Cookbook

Once you see how many tasty meals you can make, you will realize that going vegan is really quite easy and you won’t ever run out of nice things to eat. A great book to start with is Vegan Cooking for Carnivores: Over 125 Recipes So Tasty You Won’t Miss the Meat. This book shares over 125 recipes created for Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi by their personal chef Roberto Martin. It’s full of hearty, satisfying recipes that are easy to make and easy to find ingredients for. Recipes such as Tofu Crab Cakes, Southern Fride Chick’N, Chick’N Potpie, lovely Pastas and Sauces, Banana and Oatmeal Pancakes and Chocolate Cheesecake… You’ll never feel deprived!

4. Find A Good Cow’s Milk Substitute

Either soy, rice or almond milk. Make sure you choose one that is fortified with essential vitamins and minerals, such as Vitamin B12, Vitamin D and Calcium. If you start your day with a fortified soy milk over an enriched cereal, you will be well on your way to meeting your daily vitamin and mineral requirements. Many orange juices are also fortified with Calcium… so add a glass of orange juice to your breakfast and you’ll be off to an even better start.

5. Get A Blender… If You Don’t Already Have One

There is no end to how many nice juices and smoothies you can make. Create your own or look online for some great ideas. My daughter makes a really nice smoothie. She just puts soy milk, a banana, a big spoonful of vegan chocolate spread and a few Oreo biscuits into the blender. A yummy and still healthy vegan treat. I don’t normally like bananas but I love these smoothies! (And yes… Oreos are vegan!)

6. Do A Bit Of Research

Do some research online and you may find some vegan friendly shops and restaurants in your area that you didn’t even know were there. Also, think Ethnic… Asian and Middle Eastern restaurants often have more vegan options on their menus. They also tend to be more accommodating of their customers needs and will happily substitute meat with tofu and vegetables.

7. Surprise Your Family And Friends

If you’re invited to a BBQ or party of some sort, surprise your family and friends with just how tasty vegan cooking can be. They will be pleasantly surprised when you arrive up with a Chick’N Potpie and a Chocolate Cheesecake.

8. See If One Of Your Friends Will Go Vegan With You

It is much easier to get started with something new if you aren’t doing it on your own. If you can’t find anyone who is interested in going vegan with you, you can always find fellow vegans for ideas and support at places such as Facebook and online forums.

9. Get Outside In The Sun For 20 Minutes A Day

It’s the best way to get Vitamin D. You want to have as much skin exposed to the sun as possible, without sunscreen. But of course you don’t want to burn, so don’t stay out too long. 15 to 20 minutes is enough for most people. The only other sources of Vitamin D available for vegans are fortified dairy free milks and some cereals. You can sometimes find mushrooms that contain Vitamin D because they have been treated with UVB rays. If you don’t get enough sun in your area or during winter, it is a good idea to take a Vegan Vitamin D supplement.

10. Don’t Feel Bad If You Make A Mistake

Don’t feel too bad if you accidentally eat or use something containing an animal product. Even the most committed vegans make mistakes sometimes. If you are 99% vegan you will still be making an enormous difference to both your own health and the health of the planet.

I hope these tips will help you if you are considering going vegan, it’s really not that difficult!

Debbie
IsVeganHealthy.com

Photo : © Olga Vasileva | Dreamstime.com

 

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Raw Vegan Raspberry Lemon Cheesecake

Many people mistakenly believe that a vegan diet and especially a raw vegan diet, is boring. Well that is until they are introduced to raw vegan desserts.

Not only are raw vegan desserts way more nutrient rich than traditional desserts… they are so delicious and decadent tasting your non vegan friends won’t even be concerned with the lack of dairy products and refined sugars.

This delicious rawspberry lemon “cheese”cake is sure to please anyone, regardless of their diet preferences…

Ingredients:
raw vegan dessert
For the crust:

2 cups raw almonds
2 tbsp unsweetened coconut flakes
1/4 cup date paste
1/4 tsp pure vanilla extract
1/4 tsp sea salt

For the lemon filling:

3 cups raw macadamia nuts
1 cup almond milk
1 cup fresh lemon juice
3/4 cup raw agave nectar
1 tsp vanilla powder (or vanilla extract)
3/4 cup coconut oil, melted

For the raspberry swirl:

1 cup raspberries
2 tbsp fresh lemon juice

Directions:

For the crust:

1.Using a food processor, mix the almonds and coconut to a coarse meal. Add the date paste, vanilla and salt and process until well combined.

2.Press the dough evenly into the bottom of an 8-inch spring form pan. Set aside.

For the filling:

1.Using a high-speed blender, blend the macadamia nuts, almond milk, lemon juice, agave nectar and vanilla powder until smooth and creamy, about 3 to 5 minutes.

2.Reserve 3/4 cup of the filling and pour the rest into the spring form pan with the crust. Gently tap the pan on the counter to remove any air bubbles.

For the swirl:

1.Using a blender, briefly mix 1/2 cup of the reserved filling with the raspberries and lemon juice until smooth. (The remaining 1/4 cup of lemon filling can be used for touch ups after swirling. You should also reserve a small portion of the raspberry mixture for touch ups, as well)

2.Starting in the middle of the cheesecake, pour the raspberry mixture in circles, moving outwards to evenly distribute around the top of the cheesecake.

3.Next you do the swirl… a chopstick, or something similar, is the best tool for this purpose. Insert the chopstick just below the surface of the raspberry color near the outer portion of the cake, and begin gently moving it around, swirling the fillings into each other.

It’s important to know when to stop, as too much swirling will blend everything together and you will lose the contrast of colors.

Use the reserved filling and raspberry mixture to touch up areas that have too much of one color. Just pour a small drop of the mixture in that area and swirl lightly.

4.Place the finished cheesecake in the freezer to set, about 2 hours, or until the middle of the cheesecake is firm to the touch. Decorate with fresh raspberries before serving, if desired.

If you love raw vegan desserts… check these out :
Over 70 Chocolate Raw Vegan Dessert Recipes

Debbie
IsVeganHealthy.com

 

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Raw Vegan Cookie Dough Bites

How many people, vegan or not, have made up batches of cookie dough that never even made it to the oven?

Well there’s no need to pretend here… if you love cookie dough, put away the oven gloves and whip up a batch of these delicious raw vegan cookie dough bites!

Cookie Dough BitesThey make a tasty and healthy bite sized treat, great for school lunch boxes or an afternoon pick-me-up.

Ingredients:

2/3 cup raw almonds

2/3 cup raw walnuts

2/3 cup raw oat flakes
(see note below)

1/4 tsp ground cinnamon

1/8 tsp sea salt

1/4 cup raw agave nectar

2 tsp pure vanilla extract

3 tbsp dark chocolate chips or cacao nibs

Directions:

1. Place the almond, walnuts, oats, cinnamon and salt into a food processor and mix to a
fine meal.

2. Add the agave nectar and vanilla and process to combine.

3. Next add the chocolate chips (or cacao nibs) and just pulse to combine.

4. Roll the dough into balls about 1 tbsp each and place them on a cookie pan. Wet your hands if the dough is too sticky.

5. Place the pan into the freezer for about an hour to firm up.

6. Store balls in a tightly covered container in the freezer.

Raw oat flakes can be substituted for regular rolled oats or gluten-free oats, if you want. However, if you want this treat to be truly raw, look for raw oat flakes, which haven’t been steamed or toasted.

Also just remember, that although this is a healthy cookie dough recipe made with nutritious ingredients, it is still a high calorie treat nonetheless. Great for active growing children but best eaten in moderation if you are watching your weight.

At least a few cookie dough bites are better than a whole bowl… that was destined for the oven!

Posted By Debbie
IsVeganHealthy.com

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Vegan Smoothie Recipes

Vegan Smoothies

Smoothies are a great way to cool off in summer and so good for you too.

They are also an excellent way to get fruit, veges and soy milk into fussy kids.

You are really only limited by your imagination.

I mentioned in a previous post, Going Vegan Top Ten Tips, a really nice smoothie that my daughter makes. She just puts soy milk, a banana, a big spoonful of vegan chocolate spread and a few Oreo biscuits into the blender.

Okay… so it’s a little indulgent, with the chocolate spread and Oreos, maybe not an everyday smoothie. But it’s a really tasty way to have healthy soy milk and bananas. Bananas are one of the few foods that I don’t really like, I just can’t eat them on their own. But I LOVE this smoothie. Bananas are a great fruit, full of potassium.

I’ve recently found a few other delicious vegan smoothie recipes, that are especially great for active growing children… and big kids too!

Vegan Smoothie Recipes :

No Time For Pancakes Smoothie

What You Need:

1 banana, cut into chunks
4 strawberries, stemmed and cut into chunks
8 oz. soy milk
1 tbsp almond butter
2 tsp maple syrup

How to Make It:

Place the banana and strawberry chunks into the blender.
Slowly pour in the soy milk.
Add the almond butter and maple syrup.
Blend until very smooth.

Some mornings there is just no time to make those beloved pancakes.
Give the kids one of these and they will enjoy it just as much.
Try other types of fruit for a little change.

Hamilton Beach Blender For Vegan Smoothies

Red Hamilton Beach Blender

 

Pick Me up Smoothie

What You Need:

2 bananas, peeled and cut in chunks
2 peaches, peeled, pitted and cut in chunks
1 (8 oz) can crushed pineapple, drained
1 cup of soy milk

How to Make It:

Place all the ingredients into the blender in the order they are listed. Blend until mixture is smooth.
Serve cold.

This smoothie is great for hungry kids, as an after school snack. For a little added sweetness pour a small amount of the pineapple juice in with the other ingredients.

 

 

Peanut Butter and Banana Chocolate Smoothie

What You Need:

1 cup chocolate flavored soy milk, very cold
1 banana, peeled and cut into pieces
2 tbsp creamy peanut butter
2 ice cubes, crushed

How to Make It:

Place the soy milk into the blender.
Add the banana and peanut butter.
Carefully place the crushed ice into the blender.
Blend until smooth.
Drink immediately.

By leaving out the banana you can have a Reese cup smoothie.
Kids enjoy both types of this drink and will be asking for it over and over again.

Apples and Oatmeal Breakfast Smoothie

What You Need:

2 cups of soy milk
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced
¼ cup raisins
½ cup instant oatmeal
1 tbsp peanut butter

How to Make It:

Place the soy milk, apple pieces and raisins into the blender.
Add the oats and place the peanut butter on top.
Cover and blend well.

This makes a great breakfast drink for children. It tastes like an old fashion
oatmeal cookie with a touch of peanut butter. The raisins are optional.

 

Posted By Debbie
IsVeganHealthy.com

 

Photo By : Liv Friis -Larsen

 

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Vegan Recipe – Veggie And Tofu Stir Fry

Vegan Recipe

I love stir fries, because they are easy, tasty and nutritious. Here’s one of my favorites :

Ingredients

1 tablespoon canola oil
1/2 medium onion, sliced
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 tablespoon fresh ginger root, finely chopped
1 (16 ounce) package tofu, drained and cut into thin triangular slices

1/2 cup water
4 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 teaspoons cornstarch dissolved in 2 tablespoons water

1 green bell pepper, seeded and cut into strips
2 cups of baby corn, drained
2 cups of fresh broccoli florets
1 cup fresh mushrooms, chopped
1 cup of snow peas chopped
1 cup bamboo shoots, drained and chopped
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper

Directions

In a large skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat. Stir in onions and cook for one minute.
Stir in garlic and ginger and cook for 30 seconds. Stir in tofu and cook until golden brown.

Stir bell pepper, broccoli and baby corn, cooking for 2 minutes. Stir in mushrooms, snow peas, bamboo shoots, crushed red pepper and heat through. Remove from heat.

In a small saucepan combine water, rice wine vinegar, soy sauce and bring to a simmer. Cook for two minutes, then stir in cornstarch and water mixture. Simmer until sauce thickens. Pour sauce over vegetables and tofu.

Serve with rice or noodles.

Enjoy!

 

Debbie
IsVeganHealthy.com

 

Photo By : © Keko64 | Dreamstime.com

 

 

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Wondering About A Vegan Diet?


Wondering about a Vegan Diet?

It’s easy… look at this simple infographic!
Is Vegan Healthy

Wondering About a Vegan Diet? – An infographic by the team at PETA

Posted By Debbie
IsVeganHealthy.com

 

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Vegan Recipes – Delicious Breakfast Cereal

Vegan Recipes

Today I’d like to tell you about a really tasty breakfast cereal that I make a few times a week. It’s amazing and it’s all raw. The reason I want to share this with you is because a lot of cereals out there (packaged and processed cereals) even though they say they are healthy, they’re really not! Usually the ingredients include gluctose-fructose or high fructose corn syrup, colorings, or any number of other things that you don’t want to put into your body. All of these things cause irritation in the body and they are not something you want to consume, especially on a daily basis.

If you see commercials for healthy cereals, I urge you to really think about what they are trying to sell to you. What I want to share with you today is how you can prepare an unbelievable cereal that takes literally under 5 minutes to prepare. It is full of whole foods that are going to nourish you throughout the day and get your day started off as best as possible.

A lot of people say that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but I’m not too sure that I necessarily agree. Every meal is important. Your health is important.

This cereal is anti-oxidant rich because the main ingredient is fresh berries. You definitely want to start off you day with the best food possible so that you don’t feel sluggish and fall asleep at work or at school or wherever you are. My favorite combination is blackberries, blueberries, and raspberries. To prepare the cereal, I start off by throwing a few cups of washed berries into a bowl. Next, I add a small handful of chopped walnuts. I keep my walnuts in the fridge or freezer so that their omega 3 quality does not diminish over time. Next I’ll add some hemp seeds which are an amazing source of protein. In one tablespoon you will get about 8g of protein. That is huge! So if anyone throws that good ol’ question at you: “Where do you get your protein from?” as a vegan, just tell them that you eat hemp seeds. Hemp seeds are also a great source of omega 3 fatty acids. Sprinkle 1-2 tablespoons of hemp seeds on top, or however much you want.

Next I add some sunflower seeds. I usually soak them to bring out the living quality of them and reduce the enzyme inhibitors, but if you forgot to soak them ahead of time then that’s alright. Throw on a couple of tablespoons of sunflower seeds.

Ground flax seeds are a must. They are a great source of fiber, lignans, and again, omega 3 fatty acids. You can buy them pre-ground but to get the best quality seeds, just grind them yourself in any coffee grinder. You can also add a little flax seed oil to your breakfast cereal. Again, it’s a great source of omega 3. Good fats are essential to our cardiovascular system and to our brain health.

And now for the secret ingredient: shredded coconut. Coconut is another amazing source of healthy fats. The medium chain triglycerides are amazing for fat burning and endurance for sports. Coconuts have anti-bacterial properties as well. They will also help to sustain your hunger a little longer.

I recommend using rice milk or nut milk on your cereal. You can make your own nut milk in the vita-mix no problem using some soaked nuts, water, and a sweetener. Don’t worry about draining little chunks; just pour it right on the cereal! Lately we’ve been using banana milk. We just throw a banana in the blender along with some water and a drop of almond extract. It makes tasty “milk”. Just think outside of the box and you’ll come up with many, many different milks that you can use.

Now, you may get full pretty fast because this cereal is very filling. But the really great thing about this cereal is that you can put it in the fridge and eat it later because it’s not going to get soggy.

You don’t have to be a raw foodist to enjoy this amazing cereal. It is full of high quality nutrition and there is no nonsense that you don’t want to put into your body like every single cereal out there on store shelves. We’ve got berries, walnuts, coconut, hemp seeds, flax seeds and oil, sunflower seeds, and some nutritious banana milk on our cereal. Mix and match whatever you want!

One thing is for sure. If you want to lose weight or just simply feel great and maximize the energy that you are experiencing on a daily basis, raw and living foods are going to revolutionize your life, so give this cereal a try. You’ll be dumping that old cereal in the garbage straight after!

Author : Yuri Elkaim

Yuri Elkaim is a Registered Holistic Nutritionist and author of the raw food diet book Eating for Energy. Visit http://www.eatingforenergy.ca to get started with his FREE “Energy Secrets” e-course and discover what your diet has been missing.
 
Posted By Debbie
IsVeganHealthy.com
 
Photo By :
© Barol16 | Dreamstime.com

 

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Do You Soak Your Nuts?

Vegan Food

I hope you didn’t take that the wrong way (you guys that is)

Let me clarify…

Do you soak your nuts (almonds, hazelnuts etc) and seeds before eating them? If not, you may want to start.

Here are 3 important reasons why…

1. Soaking removes enzyme inhibitors

Soaking seeds and nuts (especially those that are higher in protein) will “disarm” their natural enzyme inhibitors, which improves their ability to be digested and opens up their full array of nutrients.

As a protective mechanism, nuts and seeds have enzyme inhibitors to keep them dormant until they are in a properly moisturized environment. That’s why squirrels bury chestnuts into the soil for a few days before coming back to eat them. They know that doing so will “awaken” the full nutrient spectrum of their food.

2. Soaking leads to greater amino acid bioavailability

It has been shown that soaking higher-protein nuts and seeds can increase the bioavailability of their amino acids by up to 30%! If you’re a vegan and want to increase your protein consumption, then simply soaking your nuts and seeds can make a big difference as to what your body will absorb.

3. Soaking turns RAW into LIVING

As I mentioned in the first point above, enzyme inhibitors render nuts and seeds dormant. Even if they’re raw it doesn’t necessarily mean that these foods are LIVING.

However, since soaking disarms the enzyme inhibitors that keep these raw nuts and seeds dormant, it allows them to become water-rich and alive.

There is a slight difference between raw and living. Unsoaked nuts and seeds are raw but not alive. Soaking them will change that and help you to reap their full benefits.

Which ones to soak?

You don’t have to soak all nuts and seeds. Only those that have a higher protein content.
The ones I usually recommend soaking include:

- almonds
- pumpkin seeds
- sunflower seeds

Walnuts, pecans, cashews, and pine nuts are generally higher in fat and don’t need to be soaked. Doing so will only make them soggy and mushy.

Author : Yuri Elkaim

Yuri Elkaim is a Registered Holistic Nutritionist and author of the raw food diet book Eating for Energy. Visit http://www.eatingforenergy.ca to get started with his FREE “Energy Secrets” e-course and discover what your diet has been missing.

 

Posted By Debbie
IsVeganHealthy.com

 

Photo By : © Catsi | Dreamstime.com

 

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Vegan Recipe – Brown Rice And Veggie Stir Fry

Here’s a simple vegan recipe that’s both tasty and nutritious!

Brown Rice And Veggie Stir Fry :

Ingredients

2 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons reduced sodium soy sauce
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 cup sliced zucchini
1 cup shredded cabbage
1/2 cup sliced fresh mushrooms
1/2 cup chopped onion
1 cup cooked brown rice
1/4 cup diced fresh tomato
1/4 cup grated carrot
2 tablespoons slivered almonds

Directions

In a large wok or skillet, combine the water, soy sauce and oil. Add the zucchini, cabbage, mushrooms and onion. Stir fry for 4 or 5 minutes, until crisp-tender. Add the rice, tomato and carrot. Stir fry for 2 or 3 minutes, or until heated through. Sprinkle with almonds.

Posted by Debbie
Is Vegan Healthy

 

 

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How To Make A Vegan Chocolate Cake

Fantastic Vegan Chocolate Cake Recipe : Because We All Need A Treat Sometimes!

You Will Need :

1 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1 cup granulated sugar
1/3 cup natural cocoa powder
1/2 tsp. sea salt
1 tsp. baking soda
1 tbsp. apple cider vinegar
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1/3 cup virgin coconut oil, melted
1 cup coconut water or juice

Vegan frosting
Cocoa powder
Soy milk

Parchment paper
Cake pan
Toothpick

Step 1 : Combine Dry Ingredients

Combine the all-purpose flour, whole wheat flour, sugar, cocoa powder, sea salt, and baking soda in a large bowl, mix and set aside.

Step 2 : Whisk Wet Ingredients

Whisk the vinegar, vanilla extract, melted coconut oil, and coconut water or juice together in a smaller bowl.

Step 3 : Combine Wet And Dry Ingredients

Pour the wet ingredients in with the dry and whisk gently until the mixture is smooth.

Step 4 : Preheat Oven

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Then grease the cake pan with coconut oil, line it with a piece of parchment paper, and grease it again.

Step 5 : Pour And Bake

Pour the batter in the pan and bake for 20 minutes, or until a toothpick can be inserted and removed cleanly.

Step 6 : Cool And Remove

Allow the cake to cool before removing it from the pan and then peel the parchment paper off and discard.

Tip

Chill the cake in the fridge or freezer for a stiffer texture before frosting.  Just don’t let the cake freeze solid.

Step 7 : Frost And Enjoy

Cover your cake with a vegan-friendly butter cream frosting, lightly dust it with cocoa powder and enjoy with a glass of soy milk.

 
Posted By Debbie
IsVeganHealthy.com

 

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Accidentally Vegan

Vegan Food
When first deciding to adopt a vegan diet, it can seem like you are faced with a difficult and overwhelming task.

The easiest way to make sure you are eating vegan foods, is to stick with unprocessed whole foods that you can prepare for yourself… such as fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds and legumes. This way you know exactly what you are eating.

However life can get busy and sometimes
you just want something quick and easy and
already prepared or processed by someone else.

Fortunately there are many foods out there that just happen to be vegan anyway… some people call them accidentally vegan.


Here’s a PDF put out by Trader Joe’s, which you can download and print out if you wish :

Trader Joe’s Vegan Food List


PETA also have a great list at their site :

PETA’s Accidentally Vegan Food List

Debbie
IsVeganHealthy.com

 

© Bramalia | Dreamstime.com

 

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More Vegan Diet Myths

Vegan Diet
I recently wrote a post, 5 Common Vegan Myths, about common misconceptions that the general public have about a vegan diet. While researching this post, I noticed that there are a few myths within the vegan community itself.

My observations regarding these myths were recently reinforced by a book I just finished reading, Vegan For Life by Jack Norris and Virginia Messina. Norris and Messina are both Registered Dieticians and long term vegans themselves.

Early on in the book they mention that some vegans may be making poor choices based on misconceptions and myths that have been circulating within the vegan community.

Here are a few of the common myths :

Vegan Myth No.1 : Vegans Need Less Calcium Than Omnivores

Norris and Messina recommend that vegans meet the calcium recommendations for the general public, aiming for the US recommendations of 1000 milligrams for an adult.

There has been a theory that animal protein causes calcium excretion leading to osteoporosis. This premise has always been on rather shaky ground and recent studies have contradicted the theory. While eating two or more times the RDA for protein may increase your risk for osteopoporosis, research shows that in typical diets animal protein is not a significant problem for bone health.

Unfortunately because of some of the misinformation out there regarding animal protein and calcium, some vegans wrongly believe that not eating animal protein protects them from osteoporosis and therefore they don’t need as much calcium.

There is no question that a vegan diet CAN definitely contain enough calcium, however studies show that many vegans are falling short of daily requirements.

So regardless of the animal protein and calcium debate, all vegans should be aiming to get 1000 milligrams of calcium per day. It can easily be done with fortified soy products, cereals, orange juice and lots of leafy green vegetables.

Vegan Myth No.2 : You Don’t Need A Vitamin B12 Supplement Until You’ve Been Vegan For 3 Years

We humans are able to store fairly large amounts of Vitamin B12 in our livers. Sometimes it is enough to prevent severe deficiency for as long as three years.

Some vegans have seen this to mean that there is no need to worry about Vitamin B12 until you have been on a vegan diet for several years. Norris and Messina think that this approach is a mistake, not everyone has a three year supply of B12. It depends on what your diet has been like, building up a generous store of B12 takes many years of consuming the vitamin in quantities that exceed your daily requirement. Some people will have quite low stores and will run through their Vitamin B12 supply in just a few short months.

It is easy to supplement your diet with Vitamin B12… with fortified soy milk and cereals and with Vitamin B12 tablets which are inexpensive. So why take risks with your health?

Vegan Myth No.3 : If A Vegan Diet Is Good Then A Raw Food Diet Must Be Better

There are current trends among some vegans to give up more and more food. Norris and Messina believe that some of these diets are too restrictive. One such diet is the raw food diet. They believe that there is no good evidence to support that eating all raw food is any better for you than eating a mix of raw and cooked food. In fact, some of the beneficial compounds in some foods are only available when the food is cooked. For example lycopene, an antioxidant in tomatoes.

It can be hard to get enough calories to maintain your weight on a raw food diet, which means it definitely isn’t appropriate for growing children.

These are just a few of the misconceptions discussed in the book.

The book goes into great detail about how to be a healthy vegan for life, from pregnancy and early childhood through to old age and everything in between.

It covers everything from understanding vegan nutrient needs, to practical advice about stocking your pantry and fridge. It contains meal plans for all ages and advice on managing weight, heart disease and diabetes.

It even has a section on sports nutrition… some of the most successful sports people in the world, have enjoyed successful careers while on a vegan diet.

This is definitely a book I recommend, if you want to know everything you need to know to be a healthy Vegan For Life.

It’s a book that I know I will be re-reading over and over again.

 

Posted By Debbie
IsVeganHealthy.com

 

Photo By : almagami

 

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What Does Vegan Mean?

What Does Veganism Mean
So What Does Vegan Mean?

The word vegan was introduced in 1944 by Donald Watson, the co-founder of the Vegan Society, as a new word which enabled people to differentiate themselves from those who followed a vegetarian lifestyle.

Watson thought it was important to convey the difference between the two because he felt that vegetarianism, which stipulated the avoidance of eating any meat, did not fully cover the commitment of those who wished to abstain from any type of animal products.

Vegans not only exclude all meat from their diet… they do not use or consume any products that have come from animals or have been tested on animals. This means no milk, cheese, yoghurt, eggs or honey and also no leather, wool, silk or fur. It also means only using toiletries, cosmetics and any other consumer goods that do not contain any animal ingredients and have not been tested on animals.

In short it means abstaining from consuming or using any product that has come from an animal or which has caused harm to an animal.

Although the word vegan was only coined in 1944, veganism has been practiced for hundreds of years for many reasons including religious, cultural and ethical reasons.

Environmental factors also pay a large role in why many people choose a vegan lifestyle. Modern animal farming is the number one cause of climate change in the world, causing more damage than all the earth’s motor vehicles combined.

Improving health and better weight management are also considerations for some people.

Most people choose to go vegan for a combination of reasons.

Veganism is more than just a diet, it is a philosophy and a lifestyle.

Going vegan means making a commitment to a lifestyle that practices compassion and kindness towards all animals, including humans.

 
Posted By Debbie
IsVeganHealthy.com

 

Photo : © Val Bakhtin | Dreamstime.com

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Is A Vegan Diet Healthy?

Healthy Vegan Food

So Is Vegan Healthy?

Feeling worried that a vegan diet may not be healthy?

Maybe you’ve recently become a vegan or are thinking about becoming one and you have concerns about whether a vegan diet will be healthy for you. Or perhaps you have friends and family questioning your new vegan lifestyle.

A first reaction by many people regarding a vegan diet is… “How will you get everything you need?” Many people mistakenly believe you couldn’t possibly get everything you need to be healthy if you eliminate all animal products from your diet.

Being healthy, whether you are vegan, vegetarian or an omnivore, all comes down to the same thing… you need to be aware of what you are eating and you need to make sure that your diet meets all your nutritional needs.

Overall, most vegans are very good at doing this. The fact that they have chosen to eliminate all animal products from their diet, means they have to put a lot more effort into thinking about what they are going to eat. So they tend to be more aware of exactly what is going into their bodies.

Vegan diets also tend to be lower in saturated fat and cholesterol and higher in levels of fiber and many vitamins and minerals.

As a result… studies have shown that those on a vegan diet have lower rates of heart disease, lower risk of hypertension and lower instances of type 2 diabetes. They also tend to have lower body fat and overall lower rates of cancer.

Many vegans experience positive changes from their new diet including more energy, better mood, better quality of sleep and better skin. Many also feel more alert and more clear headed.

Choosing to become a vegan can definitely be a very healthy choice.

In upcoming posts I will be covering some of the myths surrounding veganism and I will also be posting all sorts of tips, advice, recipes and recommendations to help you achieve a healthy vegan diet and lifestyle.

Debbie
IsVeganHealthy.com

 

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